If Latin America Had Been a British Enterprise

His family was originally from Serantes, Ferro...

Image via Wikipedia

Si América Latina hubiese sido una empresa inglesa (Spanish)

If Latin America Had Been a British Enterprise

Jorge Majfud

In the process of conducting a recent study at the University of Georgia, a female student interviewed a young Colombian woman and tape recorded the interview.  The young woman commented on her experience in England and how  the British were interested in knowing the reality of Colombia.  After she detailed the problems that her country had, one Englishman observed the paradox that England, despite being smaller and possessing fewer natural resources, was much wealthier than Colombia.  His conclusion was cutting:  “If England had managed Colombia like a business, Colombians today would be much richer.”

The Colombian youth admitted her irritation, because the comment was intended to point out  just how incapable we are in Latin America.  The lucid maturity of the young Colombian woman was evident in the course of the interview, but in that moment she could not find the words to respond to the son of the old empire.  The heat of the moment, the audacity of those British kept her from remembering that in many respects Latin America had indeed been managed like a British enterprise and that, therefore, the idea was not only far from original but, also, was part of the reason that Latin America was so poor – with the caveat that poverty is a scarcity of capital and not of historical consciousness.

Agreed: three hundred years of monopolistic, retrograde and frequently cruel colonization has weighed heavily upon the Latin American continent, and consolidated in the spirit of our nations an oppositional psychology with respect to social and political legitimation (Alberto Montaner called that cultural trait “the suspicious original legitimacy of power”).  Following the Semi-independences of the 19th century, the “progress” of the British railroad system was not only a kind of gilded cage – in the words of Eduardo Galeano -, a strait-jacket for native Latin American development, but we can see something similar in Africa: in Mozambique, for example, a country that extends North-to-South, the roads cut across it from East-to-West.  The British Empire was thus able to extract the wealth of its central colonies by passing through the Portuguese colony.  In Latin America we can still see the networks of asphalt and steel flowing together toward the ports – old bastions of the Spanish colonies that native rebels contemplated with infinite rancor from the heights of the savage sierras, and which the large land owners saw as the maximum progress possible for countries that were backward by “nature.”

Obviously, these observations do not exempt us, the Latin Americans, from assuming our own responsibilities.  We are conditioned by an economic infrastructure, but not determined by it, just as an adult is not tied irremediably to the traumas of childhood.  Certainly we must confront these days other kinds of strait-jackets, conditioning imposed on us from outside and from within, by the inevitable thirst for dominance of world powers who refuse strategic change, on the one hand, and frequently by our own culture of immobility, on the other.  For the former it is necessary to lose our innocence; for the latter we need the courage to criticize ourselves, to change ourselves and to change the world.

Translated by Bruce Campbell

* Jorge Majfud is a Uruguayan writer and professor of Latin American literature at the University of Georgia.

The Fall of an Empire

Bartolome de las casas

Image via Wikipedia

Cómo se derrumba un imperio (Spanish)

The Fall of an Empire


Jorge Majfud

The University of Georgia

The same day that Christopher Columbus left the port of Palos, the third of August of 1492, was the deadline for the Jews of Spain to leave their country, Spain.  In the admiral’s mind there were at least two powerful goals, two irrefutable truths: the material riches of Asia and the perfect religion of Europe.  With the former he intended to finance the reconquest of Jerusalem; with the latter he would legitimate the looting.  The word “oro,” Spanish for “gold,” spilled from his pen in the same way the divine and bloody metal spilled from the ships of the conquistadors who followed him.  That same year, the second of January of 1492, Granada had fallen, the last Arab bastion on the Iberian Peninsula.  1492 was also the year of the publication of the first Castilian grammar (the first European grammar in a “vulgar” language).  According to its author, Antonio de Nebrija, language was the “companion to empire.”  Immediately, the new power continued the Reconquest with the Conquest, on the other side of the Atlantic, using the same methods and the same convictions, confirming the globalizing vocation of all empires.

At the center of power there had to be a language, a religion and a race.  Future Spanish nationalism would be built on the foundation of a cleansing of memory.  It is true that eight centuries before Jews and Aryan Visigoths had called for and later helped Muslims replace Roderick and the rest of the Visigoth kings who had fought for the same purification.  But this was not the principal reason for despising the Jews, because it was not memory that was important but forgetting.  The Catholic monarchs and successive divine royalty finished off (or wanted to) the other Spain, multicultural and mestizo Spain, the Spain where several languages were spoken and several religions were practiced and several races mixed.  The Spain that had been the center of culture, the arts and the sciences, in a Europe submerged in backwardness, in the violent superstitions and provincialism of the Middle Ages.  More and more, the Iberian Peninsula began closing its borders to difference.  Moors and Jews had to abandon their country and emigrate to Barbaria (Africa) or to the rest of Europe, where they integrated to peripheral nations that emerged with new economic, social and intellectual restlessness.1 Within the borders were left some illegitimate children, African slaves who go almost unmentioned in the better known version of history but who were necessary for undignified domestic tasks.  The new and successful Spain enclosed itself in a conservative movement (if one will permit me the oxymoron).  The state and religion were strategically united for better control of Spain’s people during a schizophrenic process of purification.  Some dissidents like Bartolomé de las Casas had to face, in public court, those who, like Ginés de Supúlveda, argued that the empire had the right to invade and dominate the new continent because it was written in the Bible (Proverbs 11:29) that “the foolish shall be servant to the wise of heart.”  The others, the subjugated, are such because of their “inferior intellect and inhumane and barbarous customs.”  The speech of the famous and influential theologian, sensible like all official discourse, proclaimed: “[the natives] are barbarous and inhumane peoples, are foreign to civil life and peaceful customs, and it will be just and in keeping with natural law that such peoples submit to the empire of more cultured and humane nations and princes, so that due to their virtues and the prudence of their laws such peoples might throw off their barbarism and reduce themselves to a more humane life and worship of virtue.”  And in another moment: “one must subjugate by force of arms, if by other means is not possible, those who by their natural condition must obey others but refuse to submit.”  At the time one did not recur to words like “democracy” and “freedom” because until the 19th century these remained in Spain attributes of humanist chaos, anarchy and the devil.  But each imperial power in each moment of history plays the same game with different cards.  Some, as one can see, not so different.

Despite an initially favorable reaction from King Carlos V and the New Laws that prohibited enslavement of native Americans (Africans were not considered subject to rights), the empire, through its propertied class, continued enslaving and exterminating those peoples considered “foreign to civil life and peaceful customs” in the name of salvation and humanization.  In order to put an end to the horrible Aztec rituals that periodically sacrificed an innocent victim to their pagan gods, the empire tortured, raped and murdered en masse, in the name of the law and of the one, true God.  According to Bartolomé de las Casas, one of the methods of persuasion was to stretch the savages over a grill and roast them alive.  But it was not only torture – physical and moral – and forced labor that depopulated lands that at one time had been inhabited by thousands of people; weapons of mass destruction were also employed, biological weapons to be more specific.  Smallpox and the flu decimated entire populations unintentionally at times, and according to precise calculation on other occasions.  As the English had discovered to the north, sometimes the delivery of contaminated gifts, like the clothing of infected people, or the dumping of pestilent cadavers, had more devastating effects than heavy artillery.

Now, who defeated one of the greatest empires in history, the Spanish Empire?  Spain.  As a conservative mentality, cutting across all social classes, clung to a belief in its divine destiny, as the “armed hand of God” (according to Menéndez Pelayo), the empire sank into its own past.  The society of empire fractured and the gap separating the rich from the poor grew at the same time that the empire guaranteed the mineral resources (precious metals in this case) allowing it to function.  The poor increased in number and the rich increased the wealth they accumulated in the name of God and country.  The empire had to finance the wars that it maintained beyond its borders and the fiscal deficit grew until it became a monster out of control.  Tax cuts mainly benefited the upper classes, to such an extent that they often were not even required to pay them or were exempted from going to prison for debt or embezzlement.  The state went bankrupt several times.  Nor was the endless flow of mineral resources coming from its colonies, beneficiaries of the enlightenment of the Gospel, sufficient: the government spent more than what it received from these invaded lands, requiring it to turn to the Italian banks.

This is how, when many countries of America (what is now called Latin America) became independent, there was no longer anything left of the empire but its terrible reputation.  Fray Servando Teresa de Mier wrote in 1820 that if Mexico had not yet become independent it was because of the ignorance of the people, who did not yet understand that the Spanish Empire was no longer an empire, but the poorest corner of Europe.  A new empire was consolidating power, the British Empire.  Like previous empires, and like those that would follow, the extension of its language and the dominance of its culture would be common factors.  Another would be publicity: England did not delay in using the chronicles of Bartolomé de las Casas to defame the old empire in the name of a superior morality.  A morality that nonetheless did not preclude the same kind of rape and criminality.  But clearly, what matters most are the good intentions: well-being, peace, freedom, progress – and God, whose omnipresence is demonstrated by His presence in all official discourse.

Racism, discrimination, the closing of borders, messianic religious belief, wars for peace, huge fiscal deficits to finance these wars, and radical conservatism lost the empire.  But all of these sins are summed up in one: arrogance, because this is the one that keeps a world power from seeing all the other ones.  Or it allows them to be seen, but in distorted fashion, as if they were grand virtues.

Jorge Majfud

The University of Georgia

February 2006.

Translated by Bruce Campbell

(1) It is commonly said that the Renaissance began with the fall of Constantinople and the emigration of Greek intellectuals to Italy, but little or nothing is said of the emigration of knowledge and capital that were forced to abandon Spain.

Si América Latina hubiese sido una empresa inglesa

His family was originally from Serantes, Ferro...

Image via Wikipedia

Si América Latina hubiese sido una empresa inglesa (English)

 

Si América Latina hubiese sido una empresa inglesa


En el proceso de un reciente estudio en la Universidad de Georgia, una estudiante se entrevistó con una muchacha colombiana y grabó la entrevista. La muchacha refirió su experiencia en Inglaterra y cómo los ingleses estaban interesados en conocer la realidad de Colombia. Después que la muchacha detalló los problemas que tenían en su país, un inglés observó la paradoja de que siendo Inglaterra más pequeña y con menos recursos naturales que Colombia, era mucho más rica. Su conclusión fue tajante: “Si Inglaterra hubiese administrado Colombia como una empresa, los colombianos hoy serían mucho más ricos”.

La muchacha admitió su fastidio, porque la expresión pretendía poner en evidencia todo lo incapaces que somos en América Latina. La lúcida madurez de la joven colombiana era evidente en el transcurso de la entrevista, pero en ese momento no encontró las palabras para contestar a un hijo del viejo imperio. El calor del momento, la desfachatez de aquellos ingleses le impidió recordar que en muchos aspectos América Latina había sido manejada como una empresa británica y que, por lo tanto, la idea no solo era poco original sino, además, era parte de la respuesta de por qué América Latina era tan pobre —admitiendo que la pobreza es escasez de capitales y no de conciencia histórica.

De acuerdo: al continente latinoamericano le pesaron demasiado los trescientos años de una colonización monopólica, retrógrada y frecuentemente brutal, la que consolidó en el espíritu de nuestros pueblos una psicología refractaria a cualquier legitimación social y política (Alberto Montaner llamó a ese rasgo cultural la “la sospechosa legitimidad original del poder”). Luego de las Semi-independencias del siglo XIX, no sólo el “progreso” de los ferrocarriles ingleses fue una especie de jaula de oro —al decir de Eduardo Galeano—, de saco de fuerza para el desarrollo autóctono latinoamericano, sino que algo parecido podemos ver en África: en Mozambique, por ejemplo, país que se extiende de norte a sur, los caminos lo atravesaban de este a oeste. El Imperio británico sacaba así las riquezas de sus colonias centrales pasando por encima de la colonia portuguesa. En América Latina podemos ver todavía las redes de asfalto y acero confluyendo siempre hacia los puertos —antiguos bastiones de las colonias españolas que los nativos rebeldes contemplaban con infinito rencor desde lo alto de las sierras salvajes y los terratenientes veían como la culminación del progreso posible de países retardados por “naturaleza”.

Claro que estas observaciones no nos eximen, a los latinoamericanos, de asumir nuestras propias responsabilidades. Estamos condicionados por una infraestructura económica pero no determinados por ella, como un adulto no está atado irremediablemente a los traumas de su infancia. Seguramente debemos enfrentar en nuestros días otros sacos de fuerza, condicionamientos que nos vienen de afuera y de adentro, de la inevitable sed de predominio de potencias mundiales que no están dispuestas a cambios estratégicos, por un lado, y de la frecuente cultura de la inmovilidad propia, por el otro. Para lo primero es necesario perder la inocencia; para lo segundo necesitamos valor para criticarnos, para cambiarnos y cambiar el mundo.

Jorge Majfud

4 de octubre de 2006

Escritor uruguayo y profesor de literatura latinoamericana en la Universidad de Georgia, EE.UU.

 


If Latin America Had Been a British Enterprise

Jorge Majfud

In the process of conducting a recent study at the University of Georgia, a female student interviewed a young Colombian woman and tape recorded the interview.  The young woman commented on her experience in England and how  the British were interested in knowing the reality of Colombia.  After she detailed the problems that her country had, one Englishman observed the paradox that England, despite being smaller and possessing fewer natural resources, was much wealthier than Colombia.  His conclusion was cutting:  “If England had managed Colombia like a business, Colombians today would be much richer.”

The Colombian youth admitted her irritation, because the comment was intended to point out  just how incapable we are in Latin America.  The lucid maturity of the young Colombian woman was evident in the course of the interview, but in that moment she could not find the words to respond to the son of the old empire.  The heat of the moment, the audacity of those British kept her from remembering that in many respects Latin America had indeed been managed like a British enterprise and that, therefore, the idea was not only far from original but, also, was part of the reason that Latin America was so poor – with the caveat that poverty is a scarcity of capital and not of historical consciousness.

Agreed: three hundred years of monopolistic, retrograde and frequently cruel colonization has weighed heavily upon the Latin American continent, and consolidated in the spirit of our nations an oppositional psychology with respect to social and political legitimation (Alberto Montaner called that cultural trait “the suspicious original legitimacy of power”).  Following the Semi-independences of the 19th century, the “progress” of the British railroad system was not only a kind of gilded cage – in the words of Eduardo Galeano -, a strait-jacket for native Latin American development, but we can see something similar in Africa: in Mozambique, for example, a country that extends North-to-South, the roads cut across it from East-to-West.  The British Empire was thus able to extract the wealth of its central colonies by passing through the Portuguese colony.  In Latin America we can still see the networks of asphalt and steel flowing together toward the ports – old bastions of the Spanish colonies that native rebels contemplated with infinite rancor from the heights of the savage sierras, and which the large land owners saw as the maximum progress possible for countries that were backward by “nature.”

Obviously, these observations do not exempt us, the Latin Americans, from assuming our own responsibilities.  We are conditioned by an economic infrastructure, but not determined by it, just as an adult is not tied irremediably to the traumas of childhood.  Certainly we must confront these days other kinds of strait-jackets, conditioning imposed on us from outside and from within, by the inevitable thirst for dominance of world powers who refuse strategic change, on the one hand, and frequently by our own culture of immobility, on the other.  For the former it is necessary to lose our innocence; for the latter we need the courage to criticize ourselves, to change ourselves and to change the world.

Translated by Bruce Campbell

* Jorge Majfud is a Uruguayan writer and professor of Latin American literature at the University of Georgia.

Si l’Amérique latine avait été une entreprise anglaise.

Por Jorge Majfud *

Página 12 . Buenos Aires, le 24 Octobre 2006.

Dans le cadre d’une récente étude à l’Université de Georgia, une étudiante a rencontré une jeune colombienne et a enregistré leur entretien. La jeune femme a retracé son expérience en Angleterre et comment les Anglais souhaitaient connaître la réalité de la Colombie. Après que la fille ait détaillé les problèmes que connaissait son pays, un Anglais a observé le paradoxe selon lequel l’Angleterre étant plus petite et ayant moins de ressources naturelles que la Colombie, celle-ci était beaucoup plus riche. Sa conclusion a été tranchante : “Si l’Angleterre avait administré la Colombie comme une entreprise, aujourd’hui les colombiens seraient beaucoup plus riches”.

La jeune fille a ressenti de la gêne, parce que la démonstration prétendait mettre en évidence à quel point nous sommes incapables en Amérique latine. La maturité lucide de la jeune colombienne était évidente au cours de la rencontre, mais sur le moment elle n’avait pas trouvé les mots pour répondre à un fils du vieil empire. La chaleur du moment, le cynisme de cet anglais lui ont empêché de lui rappeler que sur beaucoup d’aspects l’Amérique latine avait été gérée comme une entreprise britannique et que, par conséquent, l’idée non seulement était peu originale mais, en outre, elle faisait partie de la réponse du pourquoi l’Amérique latine elle était tellement pauvre, en admettant que la pauvreté c’est la pénurie de capitaux et non de conscience historique.

D’accord : Les trois cent ans d’une colonisation monopolistique, rétrograde et fréquemment brutale ont pesé lourd sur le continent latino-américain , ce qui a consolidé dans l’esprit de nos peuples une psychologie réfractaire à toute légitimation sociale et politique (Alberto Montaner a appelé à cette caractéristique culturelle “la légitimité suspecte originale du pouvoir”). Après les semi indépendances du 19ème Siècle, non seulement le “progrès” des chemins de fer anglais fut une espèce de cage dorée- aux dires d’Eduardo Galeano -, de camisole de force pour le développement autochtone latino-américain, mais quelque chose de semblable à ce que nous pouvons voir en Afrique : au Mozambique, par exemple, pays qui est étendu de nord vers le sud, les chemins le traversaient d’est en ouest.

L’empire britannique sortait ainsi les richesses de ses colonies centrales en passant au-dessus de la colonie portugaise. En Amérique latine nous pouvons encore voir les réseaux routiers et des chemins de fer confluant toujours vers les ports (d’anciens bastions des colonies espagnoles que les rebelles indigènes considéraient avec une infinie rancœur depuis le haut des montagnes sauvages et que les propriétaires terriens voyaient comme l’aboutissement du progrès possible pour des pays ralentis par mère “nature”).

Il est évident que ces observations n’exemptent pas les latino-américains, d’assumer leurs responsabilités propres. Nous sommes conditionnés par une infrastructure économique, mais non déterminés par elle, comme un adulte n’est pas attaché irrémédiablement aux traumatismes de son enfance. Nous devons sûrement faire face en ces jours à d’autres camisoles de force, conditionnements qui nous viennent de dehors et de l’intérieur, à l’inévitable soif d’hégémonie de grandes puissances mondiales qui ne sont pas disposées à des changements stratégiques, d’une part, et de la fréquente culture locale de l’immobilité, d’autre part. En premier lieu, il est nécessaire de perdre l’innocence ; deuxièmement nous avons besoin de courage pour nous autocritiquer, pour nous changer et changer le monde.

* Auteur uruguayen et professeur de littérature latino-américaine à l’Université de Géorgie, Etats Unis. Auteur, entre autres livres, de “La reina de América” et de “La narración de lo invisible”.

Traduction pour El Correo de : Estelle et Carlos Debiasi

Nuestro viejo egoísmo latinoamericano

Estoy leyendo los titulares de las primeras planas de los diarios de Buenos Aires donde, no sin orgullo, se destaca el gran crecimiento que ha registrado el turismo, colocando esta actividad en el cuarto lugar de los rubros de ingreso al país con 3.000 millones de dólares (y confirmando el elevado incremento del PBI cerca del 9 por ciento del año anterior). Esta misma semana había leído otros informes en la prensa uruguaya que referían el dramático descenso del turismo en esta temporada (un 60 por ciento), coincidiendo con los cortes de puentes de entradas al país por grupos argentinos que se autodenominan “ecologistas” y con la venia del gobernador Busti, de Entre Ríos, los cuales llevan un mes impidiendo o complicando la entrada de turistas al país vecino. Las contradicciones entre este discurso ecologista y las realidades de nuestros países ya las hemos anotado en otro ensayo. Ya todos saben que la tecnología de estas nuevas plantas de celulosa contamina varias veces menos que las que están en suelo argentino; y nadie pide el cierre de esas plantas porque eso provocaría el despido de cientos de obreros. Podríamos agregar que el sólo movimiento de turistas es altamente contaminante, si consideramos los millones de galones de petróleo que se necesitan para movilizar a millones de personas sin una necesidad de sobrevivencia, como sí la tienen los obreros de la construcción, por ejemplo. Razón por la cual siempre me ha provocado una sonrisa irónica (sino cínica) cada vez que escucho que el turismo es “la industria sin chimeneas”. Pero no vamos a levantar la perdiz ahora. Sólo digamos que se acepta sin escándalo y con orgullo los movimientos ecologistas que mantienen a los pobres sumergidos en el hambre pero se festeja en titulares la contaminación de los ricos que se divierten en el verano austral.

No creo que por estas observaciones se me pueda acusar de tener una predisposición contra el pueblo argentino o una inclinación a favor de un estrecho nacionalismo uruguayo. De hecho tener una predisposición contra cualquier pueblo del mundo sería un absurdo. Segundo porque admiro la cultura argentina. Tercero porque me unen sueños y tragedias con ese pueblo hermano (hermano como pocos). Cuarto porque quienes me conocen saben que cada vez que hay una reunión internacional me toca a mí siempre hacer de abogado del diablo, defendiendo a los argentinos en su fama de arrogancia. Muchas veces he usado el argumento de que si ellos pecan de arrogancia el resto pecamos de lo contrario. Quinto, porque, como ya lo he expuesto más de una vez, me enferman los nacionalismos, empezando por el mío propio. No es éste el punto.

Lo que ahora me interesa es señalar, brevemente, la “actitud latinoamericana” que continuamos arrastrando desde los equívocamente llamados tiempos de las independencias.

A finales del siglo XIX el cubano José Martí y después el uruguayo José Enrique Rodó, respondiendo a la propuesta de Domingo F. Sarmiento de copiar (linealmente) la cultura norteamericana e importar razas europeas, más aptas para la civilización y la prosperidad, revindicaron el viejo sueño americanista de la unión de todos los pueblos (equívocamente) llamados “latinos”. En esta utopía, que aún hoy procuramos rescatar del basurero de la historia, se sucedieron largas historias de frustraciones. En su más famoso libro, José Vasconcellos (La raza cósmica, 1925), con más buenas intenciones que rigor intelectual, quiso revindicar a los oprimidos por el racismo (de Sarmiento, entre otros) con un racismo de signo inverso: al igual que el portorriqueño Eugenio María de Hostos lo hiciera en el siglo anterior, esta reivindicación del mestizo repetía la misma estructura de opresión de una raza sobre otras, enmascarada en un aparente universalismo y una evidente “superioridad” del mestizo, hasta ahora objeto de opresión. En este sentido, como muy bien lo expuso el educador brasileño Paulo Freire (Pedagogía del oprimido, Montevideo 1971) y mucho antes lo había formulado el peruano Manuel González Prada (“Nuestros indios”, Lima 1904), el oprimido apenas sale de su condición de oprimido se convierte en el peor opresor, porque esa es la única forma de ser social que conoce. De ahí que muchas veces las Revoluciones, con mayúscula, han terminado por reproducir las viejas estructuras conservadoras, con la ilusión visual de “algo diferente”. De ahí que la idea de “liberación” haya sido un sueño largamente soñado por nuestro continente (afectado tantas veces, desde las brutales épocas de la Conquista, de “realismo mágico”). El oprimido, cuando no se ha “liberado” de verdad, simplemente reproduce la estructura que pretende destruir. Un ejemplo simple lo podemos verificar en los discursos de Eva Duarte de Perón. Su impulso revolucionario de mujer oprimida, por su clase social y por su sexo, no era despreciable. A un mismo tiempo admirable y decepcionante, Evita pretendió cambiar una cabeza opresora (la oligarquía) por otra aparentemente diferente pero igualmente elitista y opresora (la elite peronista, cuando no el mismo hombre llamado Perón). Según Evita, una verdad era verdad “primero porque lo dice Perón y luego porque, efectivamente, es verdad”. El caciquismo era reproducido por la esclava con estas palabras redentoras: “Y cuando de mis recursos no queda ya ninguno, entonces acudimos al supremos recurso que es la plenipotencia de Perón, en cuyas manos toda esperanza se convierte en realidad, aunque sea una esperanza ya desesperada”. ¿Y el pueblo qué? ¿No es esta concepción del poder semejante a la de otro caudillo grabado en las monedas de cinco francos que decía “Caudillo de España por la gracia de Dios”? En este sentido, funciona la misma dinámica psico-social de siempre, según Frederic Jameson: la idea de que existen dos partidos en eterna pugna nos hace pensar que un cambio es posible, si uno de los dos gana. No obstante, esta dinámica ilusoria sólo lleva a reproducir un orden mediante una confrontación virtual. Y si no, observemos la política estadounidense o los aparentes cambios en América latina: quizás lo más importante sea el elemento simbólico (que no es poco), como puede ser el hecho de que en Brasil llegue un obrero al poder (mejor dicho, a la presidencia) o en Bolivia un representante de una etnia oprimida y marginada por siglos suba a la cúspide simbólica, o en Chile asuma una mujer como presidenta. Los cambios son importantes, pero muchas veces se los sobredimensiona para ocultar el verdadero resultado, que es la continuidad. La fuerza del símbolo esconde las continuidades de las estructuras sociales y de la violencia económica y moral. Claro que en el mejor de los casos debemos agradecer los pequeños pasos, que siempre son mejores que no caminar o retroceder. Pero, en definitiva, las verdaderas revoluciones modernas han surgido siempre desde abajo y nunca desde arriba. Llegar a la presidencia de un país no es asumir el poder en una sociedad tradicional. No nos engañemos: los cambios vienen de otro lado, vienen de “abajo”.

Otra característica negativa de nuestro continente, además de la verticalidad, las diferencias sociales y el caciquismo, ha sido siempre la desunión. Apenas nacido Chile como país independiente, el venezolano Andrés Bello proclamaba su optimismo: la vieja unión latina sería posible; los egoísmos eran apenas un hecho circunstancial. El brillante rector de la Universidad de Santiago fustigó a aquellos que veían en la herencia social de la colonia el mayor obstáculo para lograr la justicia, el progreso y una unión que parecía “inevitable”, dadas nuestras raíces históricas y factores tan gravitantes como un idioma en común. Lamentablemente se equivocó, como si la queja desesperanzada de Simón Bolívar ante su Patria Grande hecha añicos se hubiese convertido en maldición: “nunca seremos dichosos, nunca”. Este mismo sentimiento de derrota y desilusión también debieron experimentar (recurada Eduardo Galeano) José Artigas y San Martín. Todo lo contrario a Washington, Jefferson y Madison, según lo veía el ecuatoriano Juan Montalvo en 1882: “ Bolívar fundó asimismo una gran nación, pero menos feliz que su hermano primogénito, la vio desmoronarse […] Los sucesores de Washington, grandes ciudadanos, filósofos y políticos, jamás pensaron en despedazar el manto sagrado de su madre […] Los compañeros de Bolívar todos acometieron a degollar a la real Colombia y tomar para si la mayor presa posible, locos de ambición y tiranía”. Claro que de aquellos “filósofos gobernantes” ya no queda ni la mueca.

Cien años después, otro optimista visceral, el mexicano José Vasconcellos, repetía la misma observación negativa. En un tono arielista, quiso oponer (no sin buenas razones) la cultura latina a la cultura anglosajona (aunque confundió “cultura” con “raza”) y observó nuestra mayor debilidad: si la mayor fuerza norteamericana surgía de su estratégica unión (dejemos de lado ahora las graves segregaciones raciales), América Latina había procedido de forma contraria: una progresiva y nunca superada desunión, endémica división por razones egoístas. “[Los Estados Unidos] no sólo nos derrotaron en el combate —se lamentaba Vasconcellos—, ideológicamente también nos siguen venciendo. Se perdió la mayor de las batallas el día en que cada una de las repúblicas ibéricas se lanzó a ser vida propia, vida desligada de sus hermanos […] sin atender a los intereses comunes de la raza. Los creadores de nuestro nacionalismo fueron, sin saberlo, los mejores aliados del sajón, nuestro rival en la posesión del continente. El despliegue de nuestras veinte banderas de la Unión Panamericana de Washington deberíamos verlo como una burla de enemigos hábiles. Sin embargo, nos ufanamos, cada uno, de nuestro humilde trapo […] y ni siquiera nos ruboriza el hecho de nuestra discordia delante de la fuerte unión norteamericana. […] Nos mantenemos celosamente independientes, respecto de nosotros mismos; pero de una o de otra manera nos sometemos o nos aliamos con la Unión sajona”. Y más adelante actualiza su visión estratégica: “Es claro que el corazón sólo se conforma con un internacionalismo cabal; pero en las actuales circunstancias del mundo el internacionalismo solo serviría para acabar de consumar el triunfo de las naciones más fuertes; serviría exclusivamente a los fines del inglés”.

A pesar de los “alentadores” números registrados en los PBIs de varios países latinoamericanos en los últimos tres años, no vemos que de forma simultánea se proyecten planes de colaboración e integración continental, excepto cuando hay un discurso personalista detrás. Sólo vemos repetirse, con tristeza, otros dos antiguos males de América Latina, según el ya mencionado José Vasconcellos: uno, el cesarismo (el caudillismo); otro el “lastre ciceronaiano” (la retórica, el palabrerío). Creamos el Mercosur en tiempos desfavorables y lo ignoramos cuando el dolor de muelas aflojó un poco. Lo mismo hacemos con los discursos y las retóricas autocomplacientes. Siempre que leo los diarios financieros tengo la impresión de que si cualquiera de nuestros países tuviese el mismo PBI que Estados Unidos también nosotros seríamos naciones imperialistas. (¿Y qué sería China con la misma capacidad económica y militar? China, ese gran dragón que Napoleón evitó despertar; ese país mágico que ha logrado conjugar efectivamente todos los males del capitalismo con todos los males del comunismo).

Claro, al principio seríamos imperialistas antiimperialistas. Esta observación me desanima; no sólo porque con ella se pierde todo el romanticismo latinoamericano, sino que es una consciencia pesimista, incluso cínica, sobre el ser humano. No obstante, pese a todo, quisiera mantener mi esperanza en que los humanos no somos más miserables que sujetos de admiración. Si no es verdad al menos ayuda a vivir y seguir luchando por un mundo mejor. Pero ¿cómo luchar por un mundo mejor con una conciencia ingenua o con otra consciencia cínica? La respuesta será extender el crédito de confianza en nosotros mismos, en el pueblo latinoamericano —a riesgo de aplazar eternamente la liberación de nuestro propio discurso de egoístas campeones de la moral.

Jorge Majfud

The University of Georgia, marzo 2006